As they came off the stage, one child put into words the gleam shining from all their faces: “We did it!”

I tutor a junior orchestra of 27 children under the age of 11. Last week they performed at a local music festival. As the stage was being prepared one of the stagehands referred to our smallest member, who plays a percussion instrument, “Wow that kid is tiny!” The little guy on the piano was not much bigger but he was playing at a level most children of his age can’t contemplate.

That event last week was their first experience of playing on a big stage. For several months now they have been working towards playing a piece I composed called “The Royal Entrance”. Each player had a part in it to suit their ability level. Some of the children had only been learning a short time and only knew a few notes on their instruments. The double bass player had only had about four lessons due to unforeseen circumstances, so I gave him a mostly open string pizzicato part which he really put his heart into.

 

Next morning they had permission to come to school later (due to the lateness of the previous night) but if they wanted to come at the normal time to orchestra, I said they could have a go at conducting the piece we played. All but six eager beavers showed up—a pretty good effort after a late night, I thought.  

Looking a bit like a gym class, the first thing they learned was how to conduct 4 beats to the rhythm  “Down, to the left, to the right and up” .  Then ” 1, 2, 3, 4″ in time to the beat.

They took turns at using my baton and conducting their peers while I took over their instrument and played their part (not the wind instruments though). The first one who managed to get through the whole piece without stopping got a spontaneous cheer from the whole orchestra. As they shared how it felt to conduct, other members gave their thoughts and encouragements on what we were all learning about it. One girl, who had been shy and uncertain about joining the orchestra at first, got up and conducted with more confidence than I had ever seen in her before.  That told me that she now felt comfortable in the group too.

Not every child thought it was their thing but most wanted to give it a go anyway. Others learned that to be fully in charge of the music they needed to know more than just their own part and have an understanding about how all the parts fit together. (Spot the lesson there for all good leaders!)  The trumpet player was impressed at one trainee conductor bringing her in with a glance after some bars’ rest because she was so used to me doing so.

 

There was a special moment when I told them about a young man who had in his first orchestra experience with me some years ago in a group of children their age. This year he has been appointed as concert band conductor for the major primary school festival held every year in our city. They will get to see him in action later in the year, as many will be in the massed choir performing at that event.

 

So really, last week’s event was more than just learning to play a piece of music in front of a large crowd. I saw that they had become a team through the experience, recognizing that each person has a part to play that the others simply cannot do without.

And I think they began to dream a little bigger too.

 

The 8 most common reasons children quit learning the piano:

 

  1. No proper tuition on the music reading process

At the beginning the music reading process is a delicate balance between looking at the page and watching hands. It is about where the learner’s eyes are focusing. In Headstart Piano Book 1, I help the learner pay careful attention to this in every lesson until the habit of watching the page correctly is formed.

 

2. No balance in learning both playing by ear skills and reading music skills

Playing by ear is something many children take to very quickly and it is often the thing that draws the parent to their interest in learning to take formal piano lessons. They start lessons and suddenly it seems as though playing by ear goes out the window. The focus on reading only can dry up the child’s initial enthusiasm if not treated well. In Headstart Piano (alongside music reading skills) I teach Pattern Pieces that are only taught by ear. These are all sorts of fun pieces, some they will recognize and some that are new, to help the child focus on particular piano techniques. By doing this, the child can develop the reading technique alongside playing by ear. The skills develop separately at first but quickly blend in the right places.

 

3. No option for creative playing or improvising

I have found that the combination of learning to read music and play Pattern Pieces by ear gives a foundation of ideas for the pupil to create their own music, which I encourage them to do and share. Without those foundational building blocks it is difficult to create anything. As the Sound of Music song says: “Nothing comes from nothing”.

 

4. No real interest in the tuition material being used

For some children the material they learn from is an important key to hold their interest. I have included some known pieces for this express purpose in Headstart Piano. For the most part though, the music is original with my aim being to provide music that a beginner musician can perform proudly. It doesn’t sound trite or babyish. I’ve proved that by having children thoroughly enjoy the material from age 6 right through to 12 year olds. The level of playing ability is not drawn out with many pieces at a similar level, so they can advance quite quickly if the practice is done as instructed. There are ways of treating the material differently to accommodate different age or stage levels.

 

5. No achievable practice plan

With each piece in Headstart Piano there is a structured way to practice, play and record that progress. The supervising parent can see that the foundation of each piece learned helps the pupil take the next step up to the next piece.

 

6. Not enough parental involvement or interest

In my experience, this happens most often when a child has piano lessons at school and the parent doesn’t follow up with the lesson later to make sure the appropriate regular practice happens. After school lessons are often better and parents are more aware of what needs to happen. With a homeschool situation this is unlikely to happen as much and the child has a much better chance of someone taking an interest in their progress.

 

7. No group experience of music

While Headstart Piano is written for the individual, there are ways of using it to play with others. You can have two children playing the same piece at different parts of the piano (if they are not moving far out of position). Or, you can encourage them to use the tutor duets I have provided on the videos. An older sibling or parent who can play the piano could play these as many of them are not too difficult. Music for these is included in the resource section of the course. Pick pieces that can be played on another instrument such as a recorder, and play in unison with the piano.

 

8. No connection with the teacher

We learn from teachers that inspire us in some way or another and we want to earn their approval. The reason so many people prefer to sign up their children to regular piano lessons each week face to face with a real person is because they want the encouragement and accountability that goes with that relationship. Although this is a challenge with a video lesson based online course, I include the option to send videos of piano pieces to me  for review. I will give personal feedback for these, once in each of the 7 sections of the course for those on a subscription and 3 per section for those on the 1 time payment plan.

 

I have never heard anyone say they wished they gave up learning the piano as a child but I have had plenty of conversations where some of the above issues were among reasons mentioned for giving up learning. If you think I’ve missed a reason why children give up, I’d love to know it—because I want to be sure to address it for the next generation!

 

 

Did you know that learning a musical instrument is an excellent way to improve your concentration skills? Here are a few examples:

  • Starting with short pieces of music, a learner gradually develops the ability to concentrate on longer pieces
  • Aiming to play a piece correctly develops the ability to focus on playing slowly, evenly and getting each note correct. Deeper concentration skills develop the more you do it.
  • At a more advanced level than beginner, learning to transpose to another key is a kind of mental algebra that requires a clear picture of  the pattern you are going from and to.

 

To help your child get in the zone of better concentration you can do the following:

  1. Check out the room they are practicing in for potential distractions.

Are there:

  • active screens
  • toys
  • pictures on the wall in front of them
  • other people around
  • other sounds of any sort
  • pets

 

Eliminating those outside distractions will give them a chance then to 

  1. Deal with just the distractions inside their own head. These might be:
  • they are hungry
  • anticipating an event about to happen – like a friend coming over
  • an unfinished game
  • being upset with another family member
  • tired from being at school all day with no down time

 

It helps you realise that it is going to be a good positive practice time if they do it at a time when their environment is mostly helpful.  

 

Other helps to good concentration

  1. Have the practice time mostly at the same time each day so they settle more quickly into the zone of concentrating.

 

  1. Each child will have their own level of concentration and it won’t be the same as a parent, so we need to work within that too. Pushing it too much means it is harder to encourage them to the task another day. 

 

  1. Balance what is practiced with task and time orientation. At the beginning there can be lots of short tasks to accomplish and you can gauge how long that should take for your child. As the pieces get longer and a routine is established you may go to more time orientated practice and the learner gets better at managing  what they need to focus on improving within that time frame. Having an end point can save time wasting. 

 

  1. Always try to finish on a positive note with a favourite piece, an age appropriate checklist of things done and reward stickers that are only used for piano practice. Knowing it is not going to go in forever helps a child focus for a level that is manageable. 

 

The wonderful thing about learning a musical instrument is that the success of a lovely playing after putting in the concentration brings its own reward for the pupil like few other activities do.  The value of learning how to focus that they have learned by doing it though will no doubt transfer to other learning areas.  

 

I felt I needed some help to get rid of the extra pounds acquired at Christmas. Thanks to a friend’s suggestion I found a new app for counting steps. The app has specific goals and a variety of targets I can aim to meet. After only a few weeks I’ve made significant progress and I am now hooked to reach particular goals. The great by-product is that I’m enjoying the feeling of being fitter (and a bit less fatter) than I have for a long time.

As we settle into the new school year (for those of us who live down under) it is that time of trying new goals or learning something new. As with other ventures, when it comes to learning a musical instrument, progress and achievement come through having goals and plans in place. 

 

Here are a few music parallels from my fitness app:

The app records every small step.

Take a small part of a piece of music you are learning—preferably a difficult patch. Go slowly, and count how many times you are getting it right. When you have three correct and confident renditions, play something you enjoy as a reward and then move on to something else you would like to improve.

There are a range of rewards for different combinations.

If I reach my goal number of steps for three days in a row, I am rewarded with a certificate. If I reach a certain number of kilometres, that’s another certificate. The virtual confetti on my phone may be no big deal, but even that gives me some sort of incentive!

When it comes to music lessons and practice, children make good progress with a range of rewards too. Decide ahead of time for a reward if they:

  • play their new piece before the lesson 3 x correctly in one sitting.
  • do their practice 3 days in a row without being asked to.
  • reach a particular place in their music book.

One suggestion you might like to try is giving a coupon which is good for a special treat. Just fill it out with whatever is suitable for your situation.

Regular and often is better than a really long walk once a week.

When children start out learning, I don’t suggest they do an hour a day from the outset! But it is helpful to record tasks done, such as playing three pages of music three ways each day, plus a game or activity to help with note reading (or whatever they need help with). Then, at the end of that, to record the overall time it takes. You can see the achievement of music played through and how long it took.

Once the fitness habit is formed, enjoyment of progress leads to a desire to keep improving.

Setting up the habit is so helpful for music learning too. There is such a noticeable difference  in the enjoyment level for a child who has learned the weekly tasks. They just bounce into the lesson to show what they have achieved. The more they progress, the more they want to make even more progress.

 

Playing a musical instrument has the lovely by-product of enjoying the sound of making music. But we all appreciate incentives of some sort to keep us on track. I hope these few musings from using my fitness app gave some useful ideas for the music learning at your place.

Musicians in some parts of the world are looking for new ways to play to their audiences.  They are discovering just how important an audience of some sort is to a musician.

Here in New Zealand we are grateful to be able to play to live audiences. Towards the end of last year the orchestra I play in held two concerts. One was to a paid audience at a stunning new venue in our city, built after the earthquakes of 10 years ago. The second was a free community concert to  folks from a range of rest homes. Two quite different audiences. It got me thinking about the role of an audience when it comes to a performance. It is not hard to be a good audience, you just have to show your appreciation in some way. Both our audiences certainly did just that.

 

A wonderful audience can bring out the best in performers

Even as I reflect on these two concerts, I’m not just talking about a musical audience. Hearers in other contexts are also essential. You are also giving me an audience by hearing me out in this blog.

I noticed in our orchestral audience that our conductor, Philip Norman, would respond warmly in his chats to the crowd before we played a given piece, especially as they participated in what he was asking or talking about. As performers it gave us a sense of connection with the audience and I think it helped us want to do our best work for them.

I’m the same when I write this blog. I want to say how grateful I am for every one of you who have interacted with me in some shape or form over the last few years in response. If I have inspired even one person in their musical pursuits each time I write, then I’m happy.

 

An audience of one can be very powerful

As a parent of a child learning an instrument, do you realise how incredibly valuable it is that you actively, intentionally listen (turn off your phone) and engage with what your child learned at their lesson that day? Honestly, I can tell when children don’t have an audience of even one person. The pupil is doing the task of playing music but there is not the same joy of making music. And when you do listen, please… don’t immediately comment on the mistakes that are made. It is so helpful to comment on something positive after the first playing, no matter what. Then, you will be better received in pointing out how they can make it even better than the first time.

 

A good non-musical audience helps a performer perform well as they practice

An example of this was back when I was studying music at university. My four non-musical flat mates had to put up with all I was working on at both the piano and the double bass. The double bass was assigned a special venue—outside, in the laundry (especially for any practice before 8am!) The piano was in the house, so I just did what I needed to there. But my cohabitants often affirmed my playing to the extent that I wanted to be playing something nice if they had to listen. I realised that a non-musical audience can be very encouraging to a musician in that the musician gets much more positive feedback. A performer is so much more self conscious of mistakes if there are other musicians about.

 

An audience of musicians

There were a couple of orchestra members—one a fellow bass player with an injured shoulder—who couldn’t play in our concert this time. We felt sorry for them because our perception as performers is that listening is not as much fun as actually playing. But both these folks just loved being in the audience because they had been at most of the rehearsals and consequently knew the music and were able to sit back and hear the overall sound of the whole orchestra without a sole focus on their own contribution. They heard lovely aspects of the music they had not noticed before.

If you can, it is a good idea to encourage your child to perform a piece that you will record on video. This is a great way for them to see themselves as you see them. They may notice the music being out of time in places or how it just doesn’t sound right if there are mistakes. They can critique their own playing that way and will likely work on improving on their own initiative with that different perspective. As a young musician they can start to learn to see how their performances come across to an audience. If you would like them to have another audience, take a video clip with your phone of them playing a piece of music and send it through to me. I’d gladly give some free feedback to encourage them.

 

Back to the concert last year. One of the pieces we played was a favourite with my husband Robin, who edits this blog for me. After our performance he found a great YouTube recording of it which we both enjoyed watching. I think I played my part better in our second concert, simply because I had watched this video and was inspired by being an audience to the commitment and fervour of those performers. I should send a comment, to say how much I enjoyed it too! 

So I thought I’d share that with you. It is Prokofiev’s Montagues and Capulets from Romeo and Juliet, played by the Royal Stockholm Symphony Orchestra and conducted by a delightfully theatrical conductor, Yuri Temirkanov. I like this videoed version because there is good highlighting of various instruments as they play their parts.

Musicians in some parts of the world are looking for new ways to play to their audiences.  They are discovering just how important an audience of some sort is to a musician.

 

Here in New Zealand we are grateful to be able to play to live audiences. Towards the end of last year the orchestra I play in held two concerts. One was to a paid audience at a stunning new venue in our city, built after the earthquakes of 10 years ago. The second was a free community concert to  folks from a range of rest homes. Two quite different audiences. It got me thinking about the role of an audience when it comes to a performance. It is not hard to be a good audience, you just have to show your appreciation in some way. Both our audiences certainly did just that.

 

A wonderful audience can bring out the best in performers

Even as I reflect on these two concerts, I’m not just talking about a musical audience. Hearers in other contexts are also essential. You are also giving me an audience by hearing me out in this blog.

 

I noticed in our orchestral audience that our conductor, Philip Norman, would respond warmly in his chats to the crowd before we played a given piece, especially as they participated in what he was asking or talking about. As performers it gave us a sense of connection with the audience and I think it helped us want to do our best work for them.

 

I’m the same when I write this blog. I want to say how grateful I am for every one of you who have interacted with me in some shape or form over the last few years in response. If I have inspired even one person in their musical pursuits each time I write, then I’m happy.

 

An audience of one can be very powerful

As a parent of a child learning an instrument, do you realise how incredibly valuable it is that you actively, intentionally listen (turn off your phone) and engage with what your child learned at their lesson that day? Honestly, I can tell when children don’t have an audience of even one person. The pupil is doing the task of playing music but there is not the same joy of making music. And when you do listen, please… don’t immediately comment on the mistakes that are made. It is so helpful to comment on something positive after the first playing, no matter what. Then, you will be better received in pointing out how they can make it even better than the first time.

 

A good non-musical audience helps a performer perform well as they practice

An example of this was back when I was studying music at university. My four non-musical flat mates had to put up with all I was working on at both the piano and the double bass. The double bass was assigned a special venue—outside, in the laundry (especially for any practice before 8am!) The piano was in the house, so I just did what I needed to there. But my cohabitants often affirmed my playing to the extent that I wanted to be playing something nice if they had to listen. I realised that a non-musical audience can be very encouraging to a musician in that the musician gets much more positive feedback. A performer is so much more self conscious of mistakes if there are other musicians about.

 

An audience of musicians

There were a couple of orchestra members—one a fellow bass player with an injured shoulder—who couldn’t play in our concert this time. We felt sorry for them because our perception as performers is that listening is not as much fun as actually playing. But both these folks just loved being in the audience because they had been at most of the rehearsals and consequently knew the music and were able to sit back and hear the overall sound of the whole orchestra without a sole focus on their own contribution. They heard lovely aspects of the music they had not noticed before.

 

If you can, it is a good idea to encourage your child to perform a piece that you will record on video. This is a great way for them to see themselves as you see them. They may notice the music being out of time in places or how it just doesn’t sound right if there are mistakes. They can critique their own playing that way and will likely work on improving on their own initiative with that different perspective. As a young musician they can start to learn to see how their performances come across to an audience. If you would like them to have another audience, take a video clip with your phone of them playing a piece of music and send it through to me. I’d gladly give some free feedback to encourage them.

 

Back to the concert last year. One of the pieces we played was a favourite with my husband Robin, who edits this blog for me. After our performance he found a great YouTube recording of it which we both enjoyed watching. I think I played my part better in our second concert, simply because I had watched this video and was inspired by being an audience to the commitment and fervour of those performers. I should send a comment, to say how much I enjoyed it too! 

 

So I thought I’d share that with you. It is Prokofiev’s Montagues and Capulets from Romeo and Juliet, played by the Royal Stockholm Symphony Orchestra and conducted by a delightfully theatrical conductor, Yuri Temirkanov. I like this videoed version because there is good highlighting of various instruments as they play their parts.

  Enjoy!

Whether you are applauding a musical rendition, done online or in person, or responding to a blog you subscribed to, you are a vital part of the whole performance. It’s just not the same without you.